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Poetry D Jour by Beryl McMullen coming December, 2010


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Author Topic: Times Gone By  (Read 140 times)
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Hattie
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« on: January 09, 2018, 10:42:32 PM »

All of us born in the 1940s/1950's will recall the deep scars the war left and the incredible wartime spirit that lived on long after the VE Day celebrations..The 40's/50's also brought about huge social change – women became vital to the workforce, the National Health Service gave us free healthcare and secondary education was a must for all children over 11. All things we take for granted today..In the early 1950s life remained tough and rationing continued. But the glamour of technicolour Hollywood and the birth of rock’n’roll kept our spirits high.
There’s no doubt we grew up with very little but we always managed to create our own fun. Here’s just a few of our most cherished memories of precious times.
We can still taste the cod liver oil and welfare orange juice to this day…
Our playgrounds were bombsites, dilapidated buildings, fields and streams and we played with whatever we could find sprinkled with imagination…
The "Flicks"/Pictures were always the best fun. Cheering the goodies, booing the baddies and gripping our seats watching Zorro and The Lone Ranger, before standing up for the National Anthem…
Nothing ever happened on a Sunday except Sunday school… unless we got to go the seaside.. Remember soggy knitted bathing costume??..
There was always someone at the door – delivery boys, the coal man, the milkman, the rag and bone man, not forgetting the neighbours… but they never knocked!
Not even rationing could keep us from our favourite treat and our only take away choice was "Fish and chips"..wrapped in newspaper of course.
We never answered back, could get a clip round the ear from any grown up who thought we deserved it and definitely kept our elbows off the table…
We grew up listening to Children’s Hour, Vera Lynn and the American big band sound on the wireless (that’s a radio in a wooden box, kids!)..
Then in a flash "Rock’n’Roll" was upon us. We shaked, we rattled and we rolled. The girls swooned, the boys practiced that lip curl…
And the rebellious teenager was born. We were free, independent and doing our own thing. Yet another first for us, but we’re not ones to boast, because we weren’t brought up that way..
We may not have had much when we were kids but we made the most of it and got so much pleasure from the little things.Smiley Kiss
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Hattie
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« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2018, 11:01:00 PM »

REALLY!!
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Kandor
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« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2018, 08:03:42 AM »

Hello Hattie. I just want to say great post!

I missed lots of your experiences as I was born in 1952, but I still went through limited rationing, back to back housing, the neighbours chatting over the fence as the sun went down but I think exactly the same as you.
This is my slant on it.



I think folks...we may be the last.
For centuries British people had a continuity, the coinage I grew up with, was as familiar to me as it would have been to my great, great Grandfather.
More often than not, the money I spent could have been the same pennies that rattled in the pocket of an inner city waif 80 years before I was born, in fact, I often bought sweets with a penny carrying the head of King George or Queen Victoria, it was nothing new, nothing to marvel at.

We were patriotic back then too, I think most of us had queued up in the rain as a black cavalcade sped past, without us getting even a glimpse of bejewelled and gloved hand, but it didn't matter, we bragged about it for months afterwards, we remembered it even longer.

Our Politicians had honour and integrity, we trusted them to look after our fortunes and uphold our moral standards.
Teachers and Policemen didn't have to earn our respect, it was just unthinkable not to give it them.

We had pride in our armed services..
now they are insulted and spat upon as they recover from injuries while laying in our hospital beds.

Some of us still persevere, clinging on to our past, our values, our heritage,  just like shipwrecked survivors hanging on to flotsam after the HMS Great Britain had long slid beneath the waves..

But do you think our children will?

and if not our children, do you think our Granddaughter's, our Grandsons will be able to understand even for a second the fires that we 'Inner city' Brummies were forged in?
Of course not, it will feel exactly like when we look at old Victorian photographs and smile as we shake our heads at their 'funny ways'
We've moved on too fast in too short a time..

People of our age are the lucky ones.
We stood astride both the 'old' way of life and the 'new'
We lived in magical days, we lived our lives in wondrous times.
We are the sum of our memories..

And at the setting of the Sun and in the morning..
We will remember them.
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Edifi
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« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2018, 09:43:38 AM »

Was trying to show my G children how the money was in my childhood with our coinage old pennies 3D bits 6dshillings 2 bobs and1/2 crowns,they could not grasp it ,and said it was two big and bulky and weighed to much
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townie
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« Reply #4 on: January 10, 2018, 04:02:14 PM »

Was trying to show my G children how the money was in my childhood with our coinage old pennies 3D bits 6dshillings 2 bobs and1/2 crowns,they could not grasp it ,and said it was two big and bulky and weighed to much

Edifi They should learn, it would be nice for our grandkids to see what we used to have. We had to change when we went decimal. 
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Edifi
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« Reply #5 on: January 10, 2018, 06:52:24 PM »

It would be nice to teach them,but I think it was much simpler for us to covert from £ s d to decimal instead of the other way round.
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GardenGerald
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« Reply #6 on: January 10, 2018, 09:10:28 PM »

Evening Everyone
These posts are superb.
Do you remember the Gas Mask in the strong waxed carboard box. That had to be put in front of you on the desk in school.
No heating in the school, allowed to wear anything in school to try and keep warm. Ten minutes jumping up and down to try and keep warm
every hour. In the afternoon fifteen minutes quiet time to rest.
We had to share a bottle of milk between two of us, thats if the milk arrived. Two straws in one bottle and the teacher telling us when to suck.
Mrs Curtiss our teacher was a wonderful women and I feel sure no one would forget her.
In my class there were five of us that, because of bombing raids had new parents, but we just got on with life. Never moaned and loved our new Moms and Dads. I really wish mine were alive today. I was an only child, strict upbringing but always wanted, cared for and loved.
Sometimes no gas or water. No coal for the fire. Always looking for bits to burn. Who remembers the Air Raid shelter, all of you almost sitting on top of each other.
Cathcart Street had a railway at each end and at the north end were we lived was a  main line north. Always under attack. Duddeston Mill Road had a main gas pipe crossing it so another good target. That went up so many times and that meant no gas.
My Dad working all day and on duty at night with a broom handle to protect Washwood Heath gas Works. My Dad served in The Grenadier
guards in the first world war.
Do you remember..This is Henry Hall and Tonight is my Guest Night. Joseph Locke singing tha Aria fron the White Horse Inn. Hang on the Bell Nelly.
Then some years later we grew up to a new wonderful era. We from the age of 10 or 12 had the best youth years anybody ever had.
Times we will never forget and we did not live on drugs, Wish we could live those days again.
Take care
Gerald.
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Twm Sion
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« Reply #7 on: January 10, 2018, 09:18:56 PM »

It's a pleasure to read of what other like minded folks reminisce about. I thought I was probably one of the few that sat and pondered the old days. I'm a 50's baby and have vivid memories from about the age of two & a half.

I have made a habit through my life of talking to older folk, I've been a bit of a loner, but would talk to the older ones because I wanted to know what it was like. I still talk a lot to my neighbours, old farmers in their  late 80's. I used to speak with the older lady of the farm, who now would be 130 years old if still alive. They have some lovely stories, which I pass on to others so that it keeps the past alive, it's history and we have the means to preserve this from primary sourses.

My grandad was a lovely man, but I only had him for 7 years and I still miss him. We would sit on cold winter morning by the open fire in Mapleton Rd, Hall Green, I would ask questions, we would talk. What was it like working in the pit Granddad? Show me your pit scars Granddad? What was it like when you came to Birmingham? Did you ever see a snake on Meardy mountain?

Why did you come to Birmingham Granddad? He replied. To give you a better life Boyo! Which he did. Thank you Granddad.

I moved to Wales nearly 40 years ago, I had a longing for somewhere and for something. But whenever I am back in Birmingham, I always call in Robin Hood Cemetery, visit the garden of remembrance and say thank you granddad, if only we had had more time together.

Twm Sion

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