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Poetry D Jour by Beryl McMullen coming December, 2010


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Author Topic: DIY - Do it yourself jobs and projects  (Read 828 times)
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Twm Sion
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« on: January 04, 2018, 06:02:26 PM »

Anyone out there keen on DIY? Would be good to know what you are doing, what you are good at or what you need advice on. Would be great to share our advice and experiences

Any projects in the planning stage, large small or 'pipe dreams' ?What's gone well in the past and what have you learned from any DIY disasters?

I'm at the planning stage (just thinking about it) new doors for my workshop. Fixing the drainage around the house, replacing the bedroom ceiling and making some bird nest boxes.

Twn Sion
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GardenGerald
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« Reply #1 on: January 04, 2018, 06:18:05 PM »

Hello Twm
We have got to increase ventilation in the loft to stop damp. Have you ever fitted tubes through the sofit boards.
Many thanks
Gerald.
Never have loft and wall insulation. Most houses in Wales are not suitable.
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Twm Sion
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« Reply #2 on: January 04, 2018, 07:31:18 PM »

Hi Gerald, I've not fitted any of those tubes. Got the same problem with ventilation. The soffits on my place are quite narrow and open. The problem I have is the ceiling of the bedroom is match board nailed directly to the rafters. The gap between match board and slate is about three inches, it's full of insulation that was put n 30 years ago when I had the roof felt and slates replaced.

I also have birds that go under he soffits and build their nests on top of the wall plate and up against the bedroom ceiling. It stinks in the summer. So I think I may put mesh on the soffit gaps to stop the birds and remove the insulation, increase the gap between the bedroom ceiling and the slates and rebooted the ceiling with thicker timber.

To be honest I'm dreading what I may find as regards to rot. I'm not lucky enough to find a horde of precious coins left there centuries ago.

Twm Sion
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Hattie
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« Reply #3 on: January 14, 2018, 12:11:02 AM »

I prefer to get someone else to do my decorating.
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Twm Sion
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« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2018, 10:07:14 PM »

For months I've been promising yo put some shelves up in my office come junk room. I'm a bit of a hoarder. So need loads of storage. Rather than using individual shelf brackets I bought some of those brackets that slot in to rail that have been screwed to the wall vertically.

It's a studied wall (plasterboard and timber). Plasterboard is notorious for not holding up things, so I found the wooden studs in the wall and screwed directly into those.

The timber, I don't like chipboard or laminated board so bought some planed timber, about 35mm X 240mm. I sanded it down and put on three coats of Medium Oak Satin Varnish, water based. I managed to complete the three coats in one day and put the shelves up this morning.

Next job - preparing a 5 ton Hannix excavator for painting.....
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townie
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« Reply #5 on: February 02, 2018, 12:11:28 AM »

It must have took me 6 months to paint the hall strip and paint 8 doors by hand. I have changed the blade in my scrapper 3 times. You might think that is a long time but I have had to fill more holes and sand them down than a mole can make in a life time and there still not perfect. I suppose some people would say why didn't you just plaster, well I cant plaster and even if I could I would have had to move all the electrics.

You might say well you an't got anything else to do to do, but I want to start building my model, but getting the correct measurements is becoming difficult as nobody has made the model before. So its more research, research.     
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Twm Sion
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« Reply #6 on: February 02, 2018, 10:27:28 PM »

Paint striping is a thankless task. I spent month striping the old beams in my place, centuries of paint on them. I did learn something last year though. A lady I know runs a antique shop in the town. She had two old chests of draws. In rough condition. I had the two for 40. I stripped the varnish off easily but under the varnish there was this red paint/dye. Couldn't shift it with paint stripper or by sanding. I spoke to my neighbour across the valley, an old boy, farmed all his life and never been more than a few miles from home. I started to tell him about stripping these draws that I had spent ages on. He said try caustic soda! I went and bought some and stout gloves. I could not believe how good it was. Stripped back to bare wood in no time at all. I think the caustic soda cost under two quid. Amazing stuff.

I then did a light sanding, used a bit go mahogany wood dye and wax polish. It looks a professional job. Can't face the other chest of draws just yet.....
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Twm Sion
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« Reply #7 on: February 07, 2018, 07:25:49 PM »

I made a couple of bird nesting boxes today, one with open front for a Robin or Wagtail and one with a 1 inch hole for blue tit or coal tit. I made them out of old pallet timber, most difficult part was de-nailing the timber. Must find a decent spot to put them in.

Anyone have any experience with the wi fi cameras in nest boxes?
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GardenGerald
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« Reply #8 on: February 07, 2018, 07:54:33 PM »

Hello Twm
We have 2 nest boxes. 1 with a night vision camera. Just fantastic better than TV.
We get a range of birds nest and breed in them. Tonight it is full of Wrens in layers.
Never see them in the daytime but at dusk they all fly in. The best I can count is 14.
We also have a camera with night vision outside the nest box to see whats coming and going.
Sometimes we see a Fox or a Badger but we have seen an Otter, Also sometimes see lots of Moths.
Brilliant entertainment. All the birds nest in different ways.
Best of luck,
Gerald.
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Twm Sion
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« Reply #9 on: February 07, 2018, 11:20:27 PM »

The Wrens are an interesting bunch, I see them in the day around by my sheds and the barn. I have to sit quiet though, then you see them. I have heard a bird this last few weeks, got quite a nice song. Not been able to identify it. It's always high in a tree. Anyway, I've spotted him this last few days. It's a tree creeper. I'm not sure if it's god long tied variety. Will try and catch a god glimpse of it soon. Slowly the countryside is waking up.

Twm Sion
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GardenGerald
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« Reply #10 on: February 15, 2018, 12:01:12 PM »

Hello  Hello  Hello
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Twm Sion
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« Reply #11 on: February 15, 2018, 07:56:05 PM »

Hello to you all.

I've been doing a bit of DIY today. My old barn that I use as a workshop and somewhere to store things that I don't want to throw out, needed a new door frame and a door. The walls are stone.

The opening for the doorway is about 39 inches wide and 60 inches high. I made the door frame out of rough sawn 3x4 timber. Due to the wall being out of plumb, I decided to fix the two sides of the frame to the walls first as just two pieces of timber. Then placed the top part of the frame on after the sides were fixed.

The fixings were concrete/masonry bolts. Really easy to use saves Drilling and Rawlplugging. Firstly I drilled the timber with a deep countersink to hide the heads of the bolt.

The bolts I bought were 10mm diameter and 120mm long. The hole for the bolt was drilled with an SDS plus drill and a 10mm bit. All in place now. Job tomorrow is the go to timber yard for timber to make the door.

Countrylad
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GardenGerald
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« Reply #12 on: February 17, 2018, 05:59:46 PM »

Hello TwM
Us country boys are really into make do and mend.
Have you got an Impact Driver, that was the latest item added to the tool box.
Old screws are out in a second.
Have got a good Metal Detector to find any bits that might have fallen off the
item to be looked at.
Kids leaving School today seem to have little knowledge of repairing anything.
Keep the Hammer handy
Gerald
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Twm Sion
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« Reply #13 on: February 19, 2018, 02:49:45 PM »

Hello Gerald, I do have an impact driver, wonderful thing. I bought it about 4 years ago. Wouldn't be without it.

I had one of those early type of impact drivers previously where you hit the top with a hammer and the force moved a cam inside which undid the screw.

There is some great kit around at reasonable prices.

I haven't yet made the new door for the barn. I got the timber on Saturday. 6x1 tantalised. It was so wet due to the rain, I've put it in the barn for the wind to dry it out. I didn't want to make the door to fit the hole and then shrink.

Yes, a lot don't bother to repair these days. The starter on the tractor was playing up. I got a few quotes to supply a new one. Would have been about 150 + VAT. I stripped the starter, it was the solenoid on the top of the starter that was the problem. 24 including VAT & postage. Starts lovely now
Twm
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GardenGerald
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« Reply #14 on: February 19, 2018, 08:34:56 PM »

Hello Twm
I find pallets have many uses and take them apart with a Jemmy bar, get all the nails out and away we go.
Make good gates and raised beds and we use them for nursery beds and cover them with fleece.
Old Telegraph pole make great gate posts. The Poplar Fritzi Pauli makes very good normal fencing posts.
I always keep odds and ends and so often we find another use for them. I am not tight but its 25 miles to the
Builders or D I Y outlets.
Keep the hammer handy
Gerald.
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