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Poetry D Jour by Beryl McMullen coming December, 2010


Notice: The forum is being looked after by Garden Gerald, Nick and Townie.

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Author Topic: IN YOUR GARDEN  (Read 1358 times)
GardenGerald
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« Reply #45 on: April 01, 2017, 02:42:19 PM »

A very good afternoon to you all

Time for you to think about things in the garden

Woodlice...Friend or Foe

Earwigs...Friend or Foe

Gerald.
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nickcc
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« Reply #46 on: April 01, 2017, 05:52:20 PM »

Never liked woodlice but earwigs can bite you.  Sounds daft but when you're young these thoughts stay with you.  I remember my next door neighbour growing Chrysanthemums he always had a pot to catch all the earwigs, we never went anywhere near them in case they jumped out and bit us Smiley
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Nick
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« Reply #47 on: April 02, 2017, 03:13:50 PM »

Hello
A Strawberry is not a true fruit..Seeds on the outside. True fruits have seed on the Inside.
Still waiting for answers about Woodlice and Earwigs.
Hope you have all been out sowing some peas for an early feed from your own garden to go
with the Welsh Lamb on a Sunday.
Any questions send to me with a fiver and I will get someone to try and answer them.
Keep digging
Gerald.
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GardenGerald
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« Reply #48 on: April 03, 2017, 11:27:56 AM »

Hope you have just popped in for a cup of tea before you go back out into the garden.

Woodlice...Foe...Do as much damage to any plants as Slugs and Snails. Will climb trees and shrubs to eat new growth tips.

Earwigs...Eat or kill great numbers of Aphids ( green and black fly ). Problem is the bite with the pincers. Very painful.

Next questions

What type of fruits do Hops have ??

What are Triploid plants ??

Answers please, if no replies Miss Simpson will be round with the stick.

Gerald.

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GardenGerald
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« Reply #49 on: April 04, 2017, 07:59:25 PM »

Evening Everyone.
I have read online today someone asking what to do with bowls of bulbs you have had in the house but have now
stopped flowering. Answers from two people chop all the leaves off and bury the bulbs in the garden.
That would be the end of the bulbs, thy need leaves at least to the end of May to build up
nutrients to flower next year. What we should do is dig a hole that is deep enough for the bulbs to have nearly six
inches of soil on their shoulders. Hold the leaves upright and back fill planting hole. They will then flower next year.
The hyacinths in the first year of flowering outside after flowering inside will have longer stems and the flowers more
spaced out. Look like giant Bluebells.
If you have bulbs in the lawn cut round them as above to get flowers next year.
Take care
Gerald.
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Langstraat
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« Reply #50 on: April 04, 2017, 09:09:46 PM »

Gerald,
Here's one for you.
Last year at Easter time I bought a pot grown tree about 7' tall ( I forget the name)from my local nursery. The root ball was approx. (the size of a standard bucket) The buds burst and leaves began to form. It was planted in a mixed bed. During the summer the leaves started to drop off and by Autumn it was dead. I removed it and replanted another tree I the same spot not thinking that that was the cause of the failure. The latest tree is not showing any sign of life so I suspect that there is some form of localised toxicity. Plants within a foot are thriving well.
Suggestions please.
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GardenGerald
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« Reply #51 on: April 06, 2017, 05:06:23 PM »

Hello Langy
What was the second tree you planted.
Was the tree bought from Ministry Inspected Premises.
It could be a Toxin but please give me more information.
On the first tree what colour were the leaves when they dropped and
were the leaves on the second tree the same colour.
Did the bark become sticky.
What month of the year did they die.
Did they die slowly or quickly.
Do you see any deposits on the soil around the trees.
Give me all the information you can please.
The big problem we have is all the diseased material coming from the EU
We also now have 19 tree species under serious risk of extinction.
Recently some material infected with Plum Pox arrived here from the EU.
A very big job to locate all of that but the Ministry did it. It would have
wiped out all types of the prunus family in the UK
Ever since we joined the EU we have had a major battle on a vertical playing field.
My 2 Sons now run our Propagation Nursery and we have random checks to see
as all our material is disease free. The check is both visual and in the lab.
All tested plants and trees are tagged and must not be sold until the Ministry
say its clean and healthy.
Now we are getting out of the EU I think a lot more testing will be done particularly
on imported rubbish. Sadly your trees might have been unhealthy when you purchased them.
Let me have the answers and I will try to answer the question.
Best wishes
Gerald.
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Langstraat
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« Reply #52 on: April 07, 2017, 09:58:16 AM »

Gerald,
The tree is a Gleditsia, Golden Honey Locust. I forget what the original tree was. At present there was no stickiness on either trees. Both carried the RHS labels and were purchased from a local nursery where the climate is the same as in my garden. Both were grated stock. There was no visible signs of distress. The planting site is quite sheltered a 3x4 metre area with a backdrop of Leylandii and in between a shed and workshop. There are a few rose bushes, perennials and spring bulbs. The underlying soil is quite heavy clay although the planting hole was dug out and replaced with some garden compost.
When I purchased both trees they were tall and narrow in shape because of the nature of their display and storage at the nursery. To encourage a more open stature I placed weights*  on their branches to open them out.
* The weights were large Fir cones.

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« Reply #53 on: April 07, 2017, 11:30:00 AM »

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« Reply #54 on: April 07, 2017, 02:10:00 PM »

Just remembered, the first tree was a Sorbus
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GardenGerald
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« Reply #55 on: April 09, 2017, 04:38:11 PM »

Hello Langy
I will be in touch with you soon
Take care
Gerald.
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Langstraat
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« Reply #56 on: April 09, 2017, 11:03:13 PM »

Okee dokee,
No rush. I have lots to do:
 scarifying the front lawn, planting climbers to the wall but best of all moving huge rocks for a proposed rock garden which may end up quite the opposite as a japenese zen garden
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GardenGerald
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« Reply #57 on: April 11, 2017, 04:42:03 PM »

Hello Langy
I will start with the Sorbus.
RHS labels mean nothing at all about plant health. Just to tempt you to buy.
Is this a wet spot in your garden, a slight ooze from a water or sewerage pipe,
or is it a very dry spot where the builder buried a lot of rubble.
It could be a variant of SOD, Sudden Oak Death.
It could be Fungal Root Rot that will cause the roots to
rot very quickly and die but will not affect nearby plants.
Field Voles could have badly damaged the roots.
Vine Weevils could also have stripped the roots.
I will now look at another option and this could be the answer.
If The tree was full of roots in the pot and the roots had started going
in circles the tree would not be able to take in moisture.
Sorbus roots will not straighten and search out water so die. Thats
why I asked what Month it died. Very often June, July, August.
If you buy any plants where the roots are in this condition always
go around the root ball with a sharp knife and make a few cuts
through roots, this should induce the plant to produce new roots that
will grow straight when you plant it out in the garden.
Cabbage, Cauliflowers and Brussels Sprouts will not grow properly if
the main tap root hits the bottom of a seed tray and bends.
Hope this is some help to you and I will soon be back to you about
your other tree.
Best wishes
Gerald.
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Langstraat
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« Reply #58 on: April 11, 2017, 05:20:14 PM »

Gerald,
The roots were quite compacted when the root ball was extracted from its container. I teased them out as I have done before. The hole had a couple of spade fulls of garden compost. It was firmed in, staked and watered in well.
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GardenGerald
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« Reply #59 on: April 11, 2017, 07:09:57 PM »

Hello Langy
Sorbus roots need to be cut to get them to grow outwards and well watered through out the
summer. I understand that with a lot of plants you can give them a watering in but just
not enough with a lot of trees. Plant an upside down 3 litre pop bottle with the bottom cut off
close to the tree stem and if the weather is dry fill the bottle up every day.
If Rhododendrons are short of water in July they will not flower and any buds will just drop off.
Magnolias may do the same.
Another trick you can try is to put 3 or 4 whole wet oasis blocks under the tree.
Speak again soon,
Gerald.
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