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Poetry D Jour by Beryl McMullen coming December, 2010


Notice: The forum is being looked after by Garden Gerald, Nick and Townie.

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Author Topic: IN YOUR GARDEN  (Read 1357 times)
Langstraat
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« Reply #30 on: March 08, 2017, 01:04:57 PM »

Unfortunately I'm not working in the garden today. I have two other projects to contend with.

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townie
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« Reply #31 on: March 10, 2017, 05:15:24 PM »

Have you ever noticed that its very rare to see more than one robin at a time in your garden.
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Langstraat
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« Reply #32 on: March 10, 2017, 05:29:26 PM »

Have you ever noticed that its very rare to see more than one robin at a time in your garden.
I think they're quite territorial, and will fight to the death to protect their patch.
We've had the same one with a white patch for three years.
It's a slightly different story with Blackbirds though, we regularly have three pairs
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nickcc
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« Reply #33 on: March 10, 2017, 07:04:53 PM »

Had two wrens fighting the other day, unless it's spring.  Fed up with gulls and the mess they make on the car.  At the moment they appear to be becoming very territorial which could indicate an early spring.  Often see Blackbirds sunbathing with wings outstretched, helps that we don't have cats and feed the birds most days.
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townie
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« Reply #34 on: March 10, 2017, 07:06:23 PM »

Have you ever noticed that its very rare to see more than one robin at a time in your garden.
I think they're quite territorial, and will fight to the death to protect their patch.
We've had the same one with a white patch for three years.
It's a slightly different story with Blackbirds though, we regularly have three pairs

I imagine mating might be a bit of a problem then
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Langstraat
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« Reply #35 on: March 16, 2017, 08:53:26 AM »

Maybe I spoke too soon. Working in the garden yesterday shifting barrow loads of soil I heard 'croaking' so, with fingers crossed maybe frog spawn will follow.

The wall is now finished and capped off and the mini rotavator has been put to good use clearing up the mortar mess left by the brickies. There's still much soil to be distributed but my main task was to dig out and reposition two shrubs which have been in for about 15 years. A spiral Hazel and a handkerchief bush? I had to hire a block and tackle to pull them out after giving up trying to lift them by digging alone. They both came out with ease and were replanted closer to the wall in what hopefully will be their last resting places. The last job was to fit 6 solar lamps to the pillars

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GardenGerald
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« Reply #36 on: March 16, 2017, 12:58:07 PM »

Hello
Townie and I both responded to your post but seem to have got lost.
Is your garden part of a field and what are buildings next to you.
Gerald
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Langstraat
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« Reply #37 on: March 16, 2017, 03:38:22 PM »

Hi Gerald,

I wrote and posted a lengthy piece in answer to the questions asked of me regarding the adjoining farm land and a full background to the structures my neighbour has built. That post plus the posts about frog spawn are no longer viewable.
I didn't keep the post as I usually do so if I get the chance later I'll rewrite.
It's always a shame when the effort and time taken in a thread contribution is lost for whatever reason.
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Langstraat
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« Reply #38 on: March 16, 2017, 06:39:31 PM »

My garden backs directly onto farm land. The large field gradually drops down to a reservoir. The field until last year has been used for arable crops since its primary use as part of the 'Rhubarb Triangle' for rhubarb ceased over twenty years ago. Last year it was ploughed, fenced and seeded with grass for Beef live stock which we should soon see grazing this spring.

My neighbour is a builder by trade and hobby. He's built several projects since moving in five years ago.
At the bottom of the garden; A raised deck with a barbecue area plus an attached Orangery (a greenhouse to you and I) neither have been used since completion three years ago. It too far to walk carrying a tray of drinks and how many tomato plants does one need?

The structure you can see from my photos was meant to be a gym with a * pump room. That was finished last summer and as above hasn't been used. It has a full sized Pool table ready for use.

Now that the mini Trump wall has been finished off he will continue with the major extensions he's building to the rear of the house. To finish it off he intends to lay a courtyard and excavate a large Koi pool which will be serviced from the *pump room.

I'm going to have the surplus soil from this future excavation as well.
I'll have it spread out over the opposite side garden borders and use it to top off a rockery I intend to build.
Lots to do this year!
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GardenGerald
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« Reply #39 on: March 16, 2017, 06:53:50 PM »

Hello
Just an idea but you must think about varying the height of the wall to give you a good view from your garden.
Do this by planting some trees and climbing plants, some to run along the wall. Clematis, Wisteria and some grapes grown on the pole system would be a start plus the Wedding Day rose. Some Cornus mass would give you colour in Spring but also grow just above the height of the wall. Some Apricots and Blackberries would look superb plus give you some great fruit.
You must plant some winter flowering Honeysuckle. To walk down your garden in December and smell the fragrance is superb.
People who garden and have a good range of plants lose their marbles much later in life. I was involved in some of this research work if I remember properly !!
Keep in touch
Gerald.
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Langstraat
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« Reply #40 on: March 16, 2017, 07:15:31 PM »

Gerald,
Many thanks for the suggestions. I did have a vine and and a couple of clematis prior to the building work and I'll wait and see whether they manage to poke through. The old garden shed at the end of the wall has honeysuckle which completely covers the nearest side and roof. The furthest roof section is covered with up turned turf and planted with small suculents.
The workshop has Virginia creeper planted at its base.
« Last Edit: March 17, 2017, 03:33:33 PM by Langstraat » Logged

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GardenGerald
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« Reply #41 on: March 27, 2017, 04:14:58 PM »

Afternoon Everyone
Its time to sow some Tomato seeds for good. strong early plants. I would not bother with Moneymaker,
hard flesh and tough skins. Alicante is much better or for a a dwarf Tomato try Red Alert. Great flavour
and very easy to grow.
This afternoon I have been potting up Chrysanthemums. Get some young plants now, pot up and keep inside
and in 3 weeks time you will be able to take small cuttings that will root easily so you will have 2 plants for the price of 1.
Always sow Marrow, Cucumber and Melon seeds sideways on a long thin edge. Sown flat down most will rot.
If you have a Fruiting Cherry tree and it is very full of blossom give the tree a gentle shake and slightly reduce numbers of blossoms. This will give you much bigger Cherries and a better flesh to stone ratio.
Give the tree a sprinkle of Hydrated lime, this will also lead to a better crop.
Keep looking for more tips you will not see in many places. To some people knowledge is power. Lets enjoy a
better life by sharing that knowledge. Some people would think my family was boring because 4 of us are
qualified in horticulture. Not the case we really enjoy life working with nature and all it can throw at you.
Take care
Gerald.  60 years in Horticulture.
Gerald
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GardenGerald
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« Reply #42 on: March 30, 2017, 12:27:32 PM »

Good afternoon everyone, its pouring with rain outside, thank God we have a roof on the house.
At this time of the year people are buying bags of compost and grow bags.
Buy with care and check what is in the bags. Lots of products now contain some chipped up
garden waste from Council Waste Dumps. This may contain diseased matter that could cause
you problems in your garden or greenhouse.
Someone sent me a sample of some compost they had bought from a supermarket. It was Black,
Sticky and Stinking plus it contained pieces of branches 3 to 4 inches long.
If you have already bought some and you are not sure about it do what we always used to do.
Spread it out thinly and water with boiling water.
I am not in anyones pocket I jut give you the truth.
Take care
Gerald.
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nickcc
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« Reply #43 on: March 30, 2017, 06:09:45 PM »

Problem is that you have to trust your supplier.  We often buy from B&Q mainly because we get the discount on a Wednesday, Our local Garden centre in Breage gets a lot of our business as B&Q often doesn't have what we are looking for.
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Nick
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« Reply #44 on: March 31, 2017, 05:46:44 PM »

Evening All
Always try and buy seeds and plants from a Ministry Approved grower. This should mean what you buy is good and healthy. B&Q compost scored quite decent marks when checked.
We had a case in England where a Supermarket took delivery of several thousand plants and put them on display inside the shop. Within 2 to 3 hours customers were complaining about being bitten by small flies.
The manager acted very quickly and closed the shop. He called for help to deal with the problem and also find the source of the flies.
The plants were potted in rubbish compost with a large percentage of recycled council dump rubbish. It was
full of fly eggs that hatched in the warmth of the shop. The whole shop had to be cleansed before it could re-open. Cost a lot of money to the supermarket and the grower.
Anything you get from a council tip always sterilise with boiling water. Remember it was dumped there for a reason, it might have been very badly diseased. They will chip up any old rubbish.
Best wishes
Gerald.
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