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Poetry D Jour by Beryl McMullen coming December, 2010


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Author Topic: Bombs Dropped on Birmingham  (Read 3509 times)
Holly
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« on: June 04, 2009, 10:03:46 AM »

Where was Birmingham hit during the second world war,? i recall only one indication and that was Electric avenue Witton.
« Last Edit: March 19, 2010, 07:41:50 PM by Beryl McMullen » Logged
JOHN
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« Reply #1 on: June 04, 2009, 10:34:40 AM »

Most areas of Birmingham where damaged by bombing we were bombed out in Handsworth.quite a few places in Aston were also hit, Summer lane areas also. Where we lived in Aston there were many bombed buildings.
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John 2000
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« Reply #2 on: June 04, 2009, 11:06:03 AM »

A lot of the south part of Birmingham was bombed in fact you can draw a line from Edgbasten right across to the BSA factory ( Goldren Hillock Rd,) the area from the Bristol Rd, right across was the flight path, they started the run  from the Bristol Rd right into Small Heath, most of Balsall Heath/Highgate digbeth was hit from west to East, there was one run which I worked out ( by the bomb crators ) that there was a bomb every 200-300 meters, again from the Bristol Rd to the Mosley Rd, ( about 2 miles from one to the other,),
I think you will find that their main target was the BSA works,/the gas works in saltley/ and parts of Aston, another place was Castle Bromwich, the air field, ( where they made the spitfire and other aircraft), ...J2
PS: because I lived in the South of Brum, my memory shows only the area where I lived, but they did'nt bomb any pubs ( I'm happy to say,)
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Sex is like air...it's not that important unless you arn't getting any....
Holly
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« Reply #3 on: June 04, 2009, 12:48:25 PM »

Thank you GJ AND J2, I am surprised it covered such a large area, and yet it is mainly London which is talked about. Although having said that, Hitler must have known where and what he needed to destroy before he could get a hold on our island... Holly

J2, I am so glad that he did not destroy the pubs, dare say you would need a drink after a rough night, or maybe just need a drink.
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Beryl McMullen
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« Reply #4 on: June 04, 2009, 05:14:03 PM »

Holly -not only London and Birmingham was heavily bombed but so was Coventry, less than 5 miles away as the crow flies – it was  in a massive raid which lasted more than 10 hours leaving much of the city devastated  and the 14th Century Coventry Cathedral - Church of St Michael – was just about destroyed 

In the years following World War 11 groups of young people from Coventry travelled to. Dresden to help rebuild a Hospital there, while a group of Germans came to help to rebuild Coventry Cathedral –
GingerJohn -  If memory serves me correctly haven’t I seen somewhere pictures of  destruction from  the bombs dropped on Birmingham?   


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Holly
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« Reply #5 on: June 04, 2009, 05:23:36 PM »

Thank you for that Beryl i had forgotten Coventry, i have been there on several occassions with the Coventry Naval Association. i have to say it and i know i should'nt but, i really dislike the painting of Christ which hangs above the alter.
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marjimcee
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« Reply #6 on: July 26, 2009, 04:03:17 PM »

Hi   My Name is Jim and we lived in Stechford during WW11 in Bordesley Green East. We were bombed out in November 1940. not as you will realise a very pleasant thing to happen to anyone, but it does have a bit of humour attached to it.

Our next door neighbours were a family of mother, father and 9 children,and as a staunch Catholic the mother.. refused a specially built air raid shelter which the City Council offered to install for them. Sadly 6 children and their Father were killed by the bomb. next door to them was a poorly man whose bed ended up on the tram track at the front of the house. We were lucky as we were in our anderson shelter in the back garden. Now I was in the Home Guard and had been on watch the night before the raid then did a full 12 hour shift at work got home in the evening still in uniform had tea and down to the shelter which was the normal thing we did in those days. I remember I was just about to fall asleep at 9-30 pm when the bomb exploded and I said what a blessed nuisance Herr Hitler was when the blast from the explosion knocked me out, not that I remember any of this but my Father told me what had happened and also what had happened next door but they could not wake me. So the next morning the first thing I saw was a tram passing the front of the house through the crack of the walls of the rooms.

Now my uncle lived near to us and he heard we had been bombed and enquired if there was anyone about  from the local warden and told there was no one left.So you can image the the look on his face when I knocked on ther door to see if I could have a wash before I went to work.
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Beryl McMullen
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« Reply #7 on: July 26, 2009, 04:56:50 PM »

You tell a great story Jim -

I remember well those Anderson air raid shelters - always so damp - My grandad who lived next door would never come in - - mom bless her would chance going into the house to make tea - With our world around us shaking so very often she had to take shelter in  the lavy on the way back -
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Glory
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« Reply #8 on: July 26, 2009, 05:34:01 PM »

Three houses in Hurlingham Rd.Kingstanding were destroyed by bomb one night.Unfortunately the grandmother in one of the houses had left the Anderson shelter and was in the house making tea  when the bomb struck.She was the only casualty
                                                            Glory
                             
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Sheila NZ
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« Reply #9 on: July 27, 2009, 09:41:15 AM »

Welcome Jim, Rather a good story there, you must be getting on a bit tho
to have been in the HomeGuard  etc..........Do people say to you
"oh fancy you having a computer?" I get that and I cant be as old as you. Wink

 I went into the RAF in 1947 but did my bit previously as a ARP runner
not that I got into any trouble..My father was in the HG and like you and
many others would go on duty and then put in a full days work..
They made men tough those days eh? Wink
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Beryl McMullen
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« Reply #10 on: July 27, 2009, 05:18:39 PM »

Air Raid Shelter

The lights are out the moon is bright
Like a beast in a desperate plight
That’s being driven from his lair
Air raid warnings pierce the air

People just ran helter-skelter
To the nearest air raid shelter
Over the trees bombers in sight
This will surely prolong our night

Brought in off the street after a fall
A candle flickers by the wall
Then in a hair raising chilling sound
Came fear and tension all around

The moonlit garden came into view
Military flares rose high anew
No peace for the young or the old
All shivering down here in the cold

In this dark dank under cover
Hear bombers overhead hover
Nothing seems remotely right
When countries are determined to fight

When this war is over and done
All the battles eventually won
This will go down in history
As another human catastrophe

                                     Beryl McMullen
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marjimcee
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« Reply #11 on: July 30, 2009, 03:36:53 PM »

Now this is a true story----My wife Mary and I were married in 1944, if my maths are correct that makes marrted for 65 years and still going strong. However at that time  all leave to the forces was stopped except for those who had marriage plans arranged at that time which affected us as I was in the Fleet Air Arm and Mary was in the WAAF, so we got permission to continue with the afore-mentioned plans.
To cut a long story short Before my battery runs out I was Posted abroad in January 1945 and returned home in 1946 which meant our first two yearsf married life were 2x14 days leave and a couple of week-ends. That was 18months away from each other not a few months as is the general thing these days. Not that I am complaing but it makes me think.
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GardenGerald
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« Reply #12 on: March 16, 2017, 06:06:26 PM »

Wars cause a great deal of upset and loss of life. I had a new Mom and Dad like many others but my Mom and Dad were brilliant parents. In school in the same class their were six of us in the same situation, only one boy did not seem happy in his new home but when we went round to play it seemed to have a great atmosphere.
His Mom and Dad took him out of Loxton Street School and moved him to a school up Washwood Heath Road.
When I was a boy my Dad would take me to see the football at Villa Park. When I became a man I took my Dad to see the football at Villa Park.
Great, great memories, always surrounded by love and care but never spoilt.
Gerald.
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