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Poetry D Jour by Beryl McMullen coming December, 2010


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Author Topic: James Brindley + Birmingham Canals  (Read 5349 times)
Beryl McMullen
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« on: April 09, 2010, 08:05:53 PM »

[

James Brindley (1716 – 30 September 1772, was an English engineer and pioneer canal builder. Born in Derbyshire, he lived much of his life in Leek,Staffordshire.

At the age of seventeen he was apprentice millwright, He was an ambitious young man and moved quickly to becoming a very skilled engineer. At the young age of twenty six he established his own business, and made a good living by repairing all kinds of machinery.
In 1752 he invented and built an engine for draining a coal pits in Clifton. Then a few years later he tried his hand at building a machine for a silk-mill.  

He had a strong work ethic to get things done, which eventually opened the door for him to have the responsibility for canal building, and to be the engineer in charge  for the construction of the Bridgewater canal in 1765.

In 1768 - 1772 under the supervision of James Brindley the first canals built in Birmingham back then was on the border - with its terminus at Newhall Wharf and one at Paradise Wharf close to the Gas Street Basin to meet the Staffordshire and Worcestershire Canal at Aldersley Wolverhampton  - then in 1784 the  Birmingham and Fazeley Canal was built  which ran  from Birmingham to Tamworth,

Brindley is best known for the engineer in charge of a system of canals, which covered 375 miles in all. This was no small feat, for canals allowed coal and manufactured goods to move efficiently across to communities across the country  

James Brindley was a diabetic and he died of complications in 1772. He is well known for his determination and dedication to the construction  of canal building

Brindley place in Birmingham is dedicated to James Brindley’s memory and his contribution to the canal system in the city.

Sources
Wikipedia
Britannica
Encarta


« Last Edit: April 12, 2010, 07:34:26 PM by Beryl McMullen » Logged
oisin
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« Reply #1 on: April 09, 2010, 09:52:15 PM »

I went to school with a James Brindley but I don't think it's the same one. Brindley Place is a fitting show-piece, monument to his canal building skills. There are some brilliant (if pricey) restaurants for visitors to the city to enjoy with great views of the canal architecture.
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Beryl McMullen
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« Reply #2 on: April 09, 2010, 10:37:12 PM »

Paul perhaps the boy you went to school with this James Brindley was an ancestor of his – who knows –

According to history James Brindley married 19 year old Anne Henshall when he was 49 – They had two daughters Anne and Susannah, Anne remarried two years after his death –
London has the monopoly of the tourism industry even to tours Stratford. Yet, Birmingham the Second city still has a lot to offer, as you say, the pricey Restaurants along the Canal for visitors to enjoy.

It must be at least 10 years ago since last paid a visit to Birmingham, I stayed at the ‘Grand’ with my daughter – There were no tours offered of any kind  - everything we wanted to do we planned on our own. .     
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Beryl McMullen
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« Reply #3 on: April 10, 2010, 12:51:10 PM »



The start of the BCN at Gas Street Basin, looking towards Brindleyplace, viewed from the Worcester bar bridge, facing north-west.
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Beryl McMullen
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« Reply #4 on: April 10, 2010, 01:33:32 PM »



Yiew of the Broad Street tunnel, Gas Street Basin
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Holly
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« Reply #5 on: April 11, 2010, 09:58:25 AM »

Thats a wonderful picture Beryl thank you.
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Beryl McMullen
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« Reply #6 on: April 12, 2010, 08:22:01 PM »

Thanks Holly



Galton Bridge Smethwick
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« Reply #7 on: April 12, 2010, 09:28:55 PM »

Locks viewed from Newhall Street...



Maintenance Boat at Cumbria Wharf...

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Beryl McMullen
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« Reply #8 on: April 12, 2010, 10:27:36 PM »

Great Pictures as always Paul
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JOHN
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« Reply #9 on: April 19, 2010, 08:59:32 AM »

Steam and Water.
Canals were the highways of Brindleys dream
With James Watt who gave the power of steam
It was Mathew Boulton who had the business brain
All the things needed to bring us the steam train
Our city evolved from industrialists with acumen
Employing all trades, and the very best craftsmen
The revolution of this the great industrial age
Brought Birmingham in to a world wide stage
Canals built in all directions for the need of coal
Thomas Telford brought in to reach the new goal
Trains arrived with new station at Curzon Street
With the Waterways freight they began to compete
The fight was now took up between water and rail
An uneasy peace of rail and barge was to prevail
But would soon succumb to steam at a much later date
The decline of the waterways after losing their freight
Now the railway had gained control over the waterways
And this was to bring the canals final working days.
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Holly
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« Reply #10 on: April 19, 2010, 04:48:34 PM »

Let's not forget that the navvy or navvies that worked on these canals, (navvy being a shorter form for navigator) describes the manual labourers that worked with the shovel, pickaxe and barrows. Some of these navvies mainly Scot's, Irish and English went on to work on the Railways.
If you are interested in more information on these navvies you can get it from Wikipedia.... headed.... Navvy...Cat
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Beryl McMullen
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« Reply #11 on: April 21, 2010, 11:20:04 PM »

John -You included a lot of history about steam and water in your well  written verse -

Of course Holly there is always a labour force providing skilled trades that will help complete any project on time and that's a given
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« Reply #12 on: April 22, 2010, 08:45:48 AM »

I think that goes without saying don't you Beryl...Cat
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mariew
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« Reply #13 on: April 22, 2010, 07:44:37 PM »

What great photos, I haven't walked there for a few years, I must pay a visit.
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Beryl McMullen
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« Reply #14 on: April 22, 2010, 11:10:52 PM »

I agree - they are great photos Paul - Best of all most of us have not seen them before - Thank you
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