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Poetry D Jour by Beryl McMullen coming December, 2010


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Author Topic: Lea Hall  (Read 13580 times)
mariew
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« on: November 08, 2009, 05:04:40 PM »

I hope someone can help, I have been looking for a painting of Lea Hall that used to stand in Lea Village, or even a map, just get some idea of where it stood, I used to live in Folliott road and apparently the long driveway to the hall started at the top of that road.
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forgemills
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« Reply #1 on: November 12, 2009, 01:19:22 PM »

Hi Mariew, having looked through all my Birmingham books i have no picture for you. I have looked on Nationl Archives and have 2 references for you, they are held at Birmingham Archives, no picture though I hasten to say. First ref is Doc MS3145/19/19 dated 1862 which mentions Lea Hall and Lea Hall garden amd lawn the second ref is MS3145/19/16 dated 1835 concerning the release of Lea Hall. They may be of some help to you, but at least you have the ref numbers if you wish to take a look at the documents.  Smiley
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researching Burrows, Whittle, Stevenson, Pearsall, Davies, Draper, Baker, Rowley, Taylor, Hipkiss, Twining etc
mariew
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« Reply #2 on: November 12, 2009, 05:48:08 PM »

Thank you very much for taking the time to look through your books Forgemills, I have found out that there is a painting of Lea Hall by George Leigh, but I have tried google and cannot find it, there is also information in a book by W.H. Bulpitt (1910) but I cannot find any info on this either, so I think a trip to the library is my best bet, thanks again.
« Last Edit: November 12, 2009, 07:20:12 PM by mariew » Logged
mariew
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« Reply #3 on: January 17, 2010, 06:59:28 PM »

Although I've still got no photo or portrait of Lea Hall, I found this interesting, it was in Birmingham evening mail by Carl Chin.

[attachment removed for upkeep purposes]
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Beryl McMullen
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« Reply #4 on: March 20, 2010, 02:13:44 AM »

Railway Station


I think the entrance is quite attractive
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Telstar
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« Reply #5 on: March 20, 2010, 02:23:48 AM »

Personally I think it looks an awful cheap and tacky looking dump and would hate to have such an awful, gawdy looking place on my doorstep ....
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Sheila NZ
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« Reply #6 on: March 20, 2010, 04:13:38 AM »



Sorry Beryl, who designed Leahall station, was he drunk and
suffering from DTs..

Heavens those colours are terrible, more like something the
Indian or Pakistani shop keepers would have as a paint job--
They do like to show their wares........

Whats wrong with a nice shining black and maybe gold to
outline the major bits, or even dark red but fairground colours
NO............ Cry
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mariew
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« Reply #7 on: March 20, 2010, 12:33:59 PM »

5. Centro, West Midlands: Encouraging ownership and security
5.1 Centro and public art

In the UK, Centro (the West Midlands Public Transport Executive) has been the leading champion of public art in public transport. Many stations serving bus, train and the Metro light rail services have benefited from public art incorporated in the design and in specific art features to enhance the travelling environment. The aim has always been two fold: to create an enjoyable and quality travelling environment that is also safe and secure; and to deter acts of vandalism. As the public artist commented in relation to Lea Hall Station:

"just think what it would look like without the artwork, plain and bland - that's sometimes why areas attract graffiti and damage"

Centro has a budget specifically for the use of public art, but has also worked successfully in partnership with other agencies and private sector companies to expand available resources, for example with local industry donating materials for the artwork. At the Coventry Pool Meadow Bus Station, opened in 1994, a local company producing clay products donated fish and starfish clay pavers that were designed specifically to highlight the theme of the bus station as being the traditional starting point for trips to the seaside. In the contract awarded in 1996 for the development of the light transit system running between Birmingham and Wolverhampton, the company was required to appoint artists and designers as part of the project design team and allocate a £500,000 budget for landmark features and artists' enhancements.

Many of the artists working on these public art features have researched the history of a station or local community to develop a theme for their work that builds on the identity of the location. At Gornal Wood Bus Station, for example, the ridge decorations on the bus shelters are of little pigs. They commemorate a local legend when a farmer is said to have placed his pig on the wall so that it could watch a band marching pass. The paving designs take their inspiration from the windows of a chapel that stands opposite the bus station.

Most importantly for many schemes, local communities have been an active partner in developing many of the art designs and features. For example, for the Winson Green Metro Station in Handsworth, artists spent a year at the local primary schools developing designs with the pupils. Every child in those schools was involved in designing elements for the scheme that resulted in a large entranceway feature to the Metro Station and new fencing for the schools. The design suggested by the young children was to create a giant steam machine with a conveyor belt that took raw materials through an elaborate process in order to produce colours of the rainbow as the final product.

The example described in this case study draws on extensive consultations with the local community, including its young people, both for the design of the public art features and the refurbishment of the train station. Members of the community were also engaged in implementing the scheme by helping to install some of the public art features. Lea Hall Station is well used and rarely vandalised.

Young people involved in the design process for Lea Hall Station

Image: Young people involved in the design process for Lea Hall Station

Lea Hall Station as works commenced and after the fire to the Station buildings

Image: Lea Hall Station as works commenced and after the fire to the Station buildings

In contrast, the nearby station of Stechford, with sixty-two incidents in 2000, was the worst of Railtrack's stations for incidents of vandalism.
5.2 Lea Hall Station

Prior to the refurbishment of Lea Hall Station in 1998, the waiting environment was very bleak. The station was a meeting place for young people and drug users, and the station buildings and the platforms were the target for many incidents of graffiti and vandalism. Before the refurbishment works came on site, the station building was destroyed by fire.

The refurbishment of the station was planned to enhance the waiting environment and to improve security. The public art features were identified as an integral part of that process.
5.3 Developing local ownership

"to make it work - you really need to involve the community to make it work properly, really well" [public artist]

From the start, it was decided that the security of the Station and the success of the public art features required the involvement of the local community and the development of a sense of local ownership. Thus, local people - adults and young people - were involved from the start in the design of their refurbished station.

Collective Art Noise (CAN) was commissioned by Centro for the refurbishment of Lea Hall Station. CAN was set up in 1988 and had a history of working collaboratively with local communities in a number of public art projects across the West Midlands. Artists Eric Klein Velderman and Tim Tokien worked with local residents to develop designs for the complete refurbishment of Lea Hall Station. Initially, there was a limited brief for the art features, but, through the community consultation, this was extended and new features added.

The consultation process involved adults and young people from a youth club close to the station. It lasted over five days and involved local residents, rail and bus users. At the beginning of the process, many residents were despondent and felt that any improvements would never last but be the target for vandalism. At the start, CAN got the young people to mark out on a map the 'hotspots' for vandalism in the area and said it was important to:

"gauge the feel of the place and what people were into - looked around the estate, there was a lot of graffiti of 'shoot the moon' and then used the moon theme. The local gang used this for shooting out searchlights - this is what kids talked about in the area'

The local youth club commented on the consultation process that:

"it was really good to have a project going on at the centre and it is also nice to have the local young people
involved in something that will be on view to the public"

Image: A bright, refurbished Lea Hall Station

A bright, refurbished Lea Hall Station

Image: A bright, refurbished Lea Hall Station

The day and night theme for the design of the public art drew on two elements:

    * the lunar cycle that was recognised by the young people through their 'shoot the moon' tags (but more subtle in its approach); and
    * the passage of time for people using the station to commute into and out of Birmingham centre.

Most people saw the involvement of the young people as a crucial component in the 'adoption' of the scheme by local people and saw the designs as contributing to the sense of ownership.

The report on the consultations produced by CAN revealed that people were genuinely pleased to see something that was going to be done to brighten-up their area. The proposed designs were considered attractive, bright, interesting and relevant. Both young and older people liked the prospect of having something different from the average. Overall, the residents of all ages saw the theme and design concept as relevant and interesting for Lea Hall Station.

The results of the consultations went wider than the design, colour and materials for the public art features. Those consulted gave suggestions for improving the lighting, CCTV camera surveillance and alterations to the booking office, and changed Centro's perceptions of what constituted the front of the station. Better lighting and steel fencing were suggested for the alleyway as the wooden fence was being repeatedly vandalised, often within days of being repaired.

Curved bus shelters were recommended through the consultations. The then existing flat topped shelters were seen as a nuisance, with young people climbing on top and using the additional height to throw stones at the railway track and trains.

The work carried out at Lea Hall Station included a new booking office, enhanced lighting, the clearing of trees and shrubs to create clear sight lines, ramps providing easier access to the platforms, and the installation of CCTV surveillance cameras. Consideration was given to the whole journey through the construction of a new car park, new bus stops outside the Station and improvements to the alleyway. The public art features can be seen in the mosaic flooring, the car park height restrictor, wall murals on the platforms and the security fencing. Local people were involved in laying the mosaic flooring to foster a greater sense of ownership.

Refurbishment work began in August 1997 and was completed in Summer 1998. The cost of the scheme was £760,000. The additional cost of including public art features (that is, the cost over and above the standard cost and fees of such a scheme) was less than 5% at Lea Hall Station. The percentage over standard cost may be higher for smaller scale schemes with much lower fabrication costs and fees.
5.4 An assessment of the scheme

[5] Lea Hall Station was re-opened in 1998. There has been very little vandalism to the station's structure or to the artwork. Passengers attribute a greater feeling of safety to the openness of the design, the enhanced lighting, a staff presence, CCTV surveillance and overall cleanliness. The majority of respondents in a survey carried out early in 2001 described the improvements and the artwork as good or very good and said they improved their feelings of safety at Lea Hall Station.

In the Centro survey, the highest levels of customer satisfaction were with the location of the booking office, the design and layout of the station, the artwork at the entrance and the platforms, and the signage. The security at the car park was also highly rated by respondents. The most common additional comment was that Lea Hall Station was now cleaner or nicer.

In that survey:

27% of respondents said they would recommend use of Lea Hall Station to someone else;

26% had started to use Lea Hall in the last six months, most for off-peak leisure and shopping trips;

8% of respondents had previously used their car for this journey; and

87% said the design and layout of the station was good or very good.
5.5 Issues Emerging from the Initiative

The artists acknowledge that using art in the design of transport infrastructure is a risk-taking exercise for the client. But, if successful, the results can not only create a pleasant and interesting waiting environment but also encourage local ownership by young people and adults. This in turn can reduce the incidents of vandalism and graffiti and the cost of cleaning and repair.

There are a lot of challenges for the artist engaged in such a scheme, including those of the budget for the scheme and on-going maintenance, and Health and Safety regulations. Any features must be functional, as well as satisfying the needs of those consulted and have artistic merit.

The issue with many public art features is about their maintenance costs. The artist has to be very aware that the client desires low or little maintenance costs and robust fixtures that will stand the test of time. Metal features are generally low cost, but multi-colour paintings can be expensive to restore or repair. Maintenance costs need to be considered from the start.

All the elements in the refurbishment or development of new infrastructure are important. To be successful, the design to upgrade the infrastructure needs to be integrated with the public art. There was criticism, for example, of a scheme at Stourbridge Station where a public art feature was installed in the middle of a car park that had not been re-surfaced as part of the package.

[5] This section draws on two reports: the Lea Hall Station After Survey completed by Centro in August 1998 and a thesis by Eiryl N Jones for Coventry University and entitled 'Taking the Bus? The Perceptions of Crime on Public Transport' March 2001. The latter compares the travelling environments at Lea Hall and Stechford Stations. In addition, visits to Lea Hall Station were made for this report.

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mariew
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« Reply #8 on: March 20, 2010, 12:35:51 PM »

I used to catch the train to town from Lea Hall and believe me before the improvements it was a really bleak place.
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Beryl McMullen
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« Reply #9 on: March 20, 2010, 03:24:19 PM »

Telstar and Sheila I have never been to Lea Hall, but after seeing the picture of the rest of the station on this link - I think you are both dead right. . .

http://www.railaroundbirmingham.co.uk/Stations/lea_hall.php
« Last Edit: March 21, 2010, 02:16:51 PM by Beryl McMullen » Logged
Beryl McMullen
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« Reply #10 on: March 20, 2010, 03:37:37 PM »

Water Colour - Farm near Lea Hall - Arthur Lockwood

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Telstar
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« Reply #11 on: March 20, 2010, 09:55:27 PM »

Sorry, but for me, the King is in the altogether and Lea Hall station is an eyesore no matter how you dress it up and try to sell it .... You can also plainly see graffiti on the wall .... along with the scruffy work of the " Artist ...."

Most public art is uninspiring and looks a mess .... It actually downgrades almost anywhere it's put and for me, is almost a legalised form of graffiti, except someone is paid to do it .... and .... of course, an artist, even fourth rate, will talk and big it up ....

The money would be better spent educating the young children involved to respect public property instead of getting them to participate in making the place look like a chavs hangout ....

 

       
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Beryl McMullen
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« Reply #12 on: March 21, 2010, 03:13:05 PM »

Hi Telestar - When I first saw the gate - I thought it was lively and welcoming - but when I see the rest of it - I have to agree it isn't one bit tasteful. .

I believe the money would be better spent on something more worthwhile.

Having said that, though there must be some, I donít ever recall seeing a Railway Station as being particularly architecturally attractive anyway 
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Telstar
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« Reply #13 on: March 22, 2010, 01:21:59 AM »

Railway stations have a place in peoples lives that use them .... People that do use them, whether mainline or local, spend their time, enough of their time, to bond, connect with their surroundings, like others do at a favourite bus stop .... maybe ....

Architecture, like a field of trees and flowers, a beautiful meadow, plays a part in our lives, whether standing on a platform or at a bus stop .... Old Snow Hill Station, Colmore Row, Old New Street Station .... or the old bus shelters that once stood at Snow Hill, Colmore Row .... along with the beauty of the ones gone at the old Lickey Hills, have never been replicated .... No one standing in the Lea Hall's or any of that kind of crap, could ever feel the same, as those that once enjoyed a smoggy night in a beautiful old city long since passed ....

Good architecture, for me .... no matter what it is .... should inspire you and, fit like a hand in a glove .... make you feel at one with your surroundings .... make you want to be there .... walk up that street .... lead you on .... Cities like Paris, London, Rome, even Dublin .... inspire you to take the corner .... Where poor old New Brum, though much loved .... has broken alot of old Brummies hearts .... It now has too much and too many Lea Hall's, with too many people thinking it's OK .... I don't think it is .... that's all ....          
« Last Edit: March 22, 2010, 01:40:13 AM by Telstar » Logged

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Sheila NZ
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« Reply #14 on: March 22, 2010, 01:30:11 AM »

Walking arounf Brum a short time after the war I remember
all the beautiful old buildings that still stood,they had survived
everything that Hitler could throw at them, they stood proud
amongst the ruins.
Then along came the highly educated "we know best for Brum"
brigade and look what they landed us with, maybe then we
needed another Furher to get rid of that rubbish.
Now I dont know, I have,nt been to Brumijam since 1986 so am
behind the times, but as Telstar says Colmore Row,Snow Hill Stn
Livery Street all had a special charm and whats left..Tatty stuff.

The children of today won,t have the lovely buildings to
remember when they get old..Am glad I do....
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