BIRMINGHAM AND SURROUNDING COUNTIES FORUM

In your Garden => Gardening advice and tips => Topic started by: GardenGerald on December 18, 2016, 10:04:37 PM



Title: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on December 18, 2016, 10:04:37 PM
Will their be any interest from at least 20 people if I write some notes on a weekly basis. When
I tried before the response was rather poor but the thread was pushed from plillar to post and
I will never know why. Their is a big interest in growing and the garden, the thread should have a Prime site.
Look forward to hearing from you all.
I am doing this to try and get some life back in this forum. At the moment it is dead from the neck up.
Best wishes
Gerald.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: nickcc on December 19, 2016, 08:26:46 AM
Very doubtful as there's usually only two members posting. 


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on December 19, 2016, 12:29:06 PM
Save all your Mistletoe berries and after Christmas I will tell you how to grow your own Mistletoe. On Boxing day
take a walk and collect some Holly berries. Look for variegated foliage types.
Gerald


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on December 19, 2016, 04:56:47 PM
Hello Everyone
Lots of papers and magazines with articles about how good coffee is for getting rid of slugs and snails.
They have not read in full the research work about the use of coffee and coffee grounds. You can use it in the flower borders but never near anything you are going to eat. It gives a very odd flavour to edible crops. The coffee shops are now selling all the coffee grounds to be made into compressed
log fuel for wood burners.
Burn well but are rather expensive.
Come on all you good people get posting.
Best wishes
Gerald/


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on December 19, 2016, 08:44:31 PM
Evening
Still got Dahlias in the garden. Dig them up straight away and cut the stems down to 4 or 5 inches. Place upside down in a frost free place so
that any water can drain out of hollow stems. Leave like this for 2 to 3 weeks and then place in strong paper bags until late March. Make sure the storage area is frost free.
Take care
Gerald.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on December 20, 2016, 08:13:53 PM
Its that time of the year when we all have some nuts around, in a bowl of course.
This year you will select 6 Walnuts, 6 Spanish Nuts (Hazels), 6 peanuts in shells and 6 Chestnuts. You keep them in an airy situation
that is cool. Select good nuts not any that someone has had the crackers to.
The week after Christmas I will give you some help in getting them to grow.
How many of you will be opening a bottle of Home Brew or Wine that you have produced yourself.
If you have a dicky heart go steady with the Sherry or you may find yourself in hospital.
How many of you have made apple juice, very simple and keeps for months.
Christmas week is a great time to take cuttings off some plants. So if anyone is asking you what to get you for Christmas
say a pair of ByPass Secateurs and a Garden Knife both with Carbon Steel blades please.
Lots of people have Stainless Steel but it will not give you the good clean cutting edge you need.
When you read this please make a post, do not worry if it sounds or looks a bit strange.
Do you remember Percy Thrower, a really nice person but when he was on air there was always a prompt board in front of him.
With me I just fumbled on and if I made a mistake I would make a joke of it.
Please get posting, I want to hear from you.
Best wishes.
Gerald.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on December 21, 2016, 06:20:27 PM
Evening All
We all like a good Sweet Pea so when you are out and about this week buy a packet of UK Sweet Pea seeds.
On Boxing Day we will sow them and I will try and show you how to have the best display of flowers you have ever had.
I will have my annual drink on Christmas Day, half a pint of Shandy.
The next day I will potter about outside because we will soon be starting a New Year and I want everything Spick and Span. What new plant would you like to grow next year ???  Let me know.
Take care
Gerald.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on January 26, 2017, 09:21:41 PM
Hello everyone
Back in the garden soon. Been unwell since Christmas with a terrible cough and congested chest and I'm still not
really any better.
Gerald


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on February 10, 2017, 11:27:15 AM
Slowly getting better.
This will be the best forum for garden advice so keep looking.
Any question just ask and I will do my best to answer.
Best wishes
Gerald.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: nickcc on February 10, 2017, 11:54:29 AM
Hope you continue with your improvement.  Too cold for me to start gardening yet, unfortunately still having to cut the lawns.

Next job is removing the old hedging in the back garden which is overgrown, dead in parts and full of brambles.  Just had a delivery of fence panels, posts and metposts so looks like I'll be busy soon.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on February 15, 2017, 02:05:00 PM
Afternoon Everyone
The Chemicals you need in your garden

EPSOM SALTS  Boosts root growth
BICARBONATE OF SODA  Kills Moulds, Mildew anf Fungal Infections
SOFT SOAP  ( Not washing up Liquid)  Gets rid of Insects
SULPHATE OF IRON  If Raspberries start turning yellow  and a pinch for plants that like acid soils.
CHOPPED UP SOFT WILLOW GROWTH SOAKING IM WATER  This is a very good rooting hormone.
BORAX   If you have big problems with Ants.

This weekend we will look at taking late winter cuttings and dividing plants. Get a really good sharp Carbon Steel knife ready.
Keep growing
Gerald


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on February 19, 2017, 08:52:34 PM
Hope you have been out to the shops or chemist to buy the items we will need
The garden class opens this week.
Cuttings and seed sowing will be on the agenda.
Keep looking
Gerald.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on February 20, 2017, 10:10:03 PM
Evening Everyone
Whats your favourite Flower
Whats your favourite Vegetable
Whats your favourite Salad plant
Lets talk about them and then grow them.

Looking forward to hearing from you.
Gerald


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on February 21, 2017, 01:19:38 PM
Have you cleaned up all the tools you put away last year covered in muck and rubbish.
If you do not clean them it is a wonderful way of spreading germs and disease.
The good gardener is a clean gardener.
We import lots of rubbish so please do not add to the problems.
Buy UK to grow in the UK.
Little bit of morning exercise to get you fit. Walk round the garden clockwise then anti clockwise.
What plants did you stop to look at.
What about putting some posts on this forum
Gerald.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on February 21, 2017, 06:23:28 PM
Todays Question

What sort or type of Fruit is a Strawberry

Answers please.

Gerald.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: nickcc on February 21, 2017, 07:40:23 PM
Todays Question

What sort or type of Fruit is a Strawberry

Answers please.

Gerald.
they be runners :)


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on February 21, 2017, 07:53:03 PM
Hello Nick
We had some leave their running spikes behind last year.
Trouble was they were too small for me.
Gerald.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on February 22, 2017, 07:16:08 PM
What jobs have you done in the garden today. I have taken some
Grape vine cuttings. Anyone can grow Grapes up to a line across from
North Wales. So that's Stafford, Leicester, Lincolnshire and parts of Chester.
Horses for courses, the right variety for your area. Have a bash. Want
more help send me a private note.
Gerald.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: nickcc on February 23, 2017, 08:23:35 AM
Taking down old hedging full of brambles etc.  Unfortunately about 8 ft tall by 40 ft long so not a pleasant job especially taking the rubbish to the tip.  Replacing with 6ft panels where my Wife will plant tall shrubs to hide :)


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on February 23, 2017, 03:06:35 PM
Hello Nick and Mrs Nick
Do not waste the the space against the panels, make it into a mini fruit garden.
Dwarf fruit trees, remove back growth and breast growth (thats the growth coming forward).
You will now have flat growth against boards but will be very productive with quality fruit. When planted pull side branches slightly down, this will improve size and number of real quality fruit. Do this with Apple, pear, Plum and  Cherries, In between trees plant some Gooseberries and  Currants of all colours, some Blackberries and
Vines that fruit and also have colourful foliage.
Now how does that grab you both.
When you go to a show and you think why do my fruits not look as good as these. Its the way you grow them.
You have now got the Grow How so what are you waiting for.
Best wishes and be successful. I will want to see some pictures.
Gerald.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: Langstraat on March 01, 2017, 06:05:12 PM
Some would say the 1st of March heralds the first day of Spring. I personally use the equinox date but that's no matter. Last week I even heard a lawn mower clear its throat after being in hibernation.
I've not been able to play out in the garden for months but that's not stopped by neighbour from braving the weather and generally causing havoc to my spring collection of spring bulbs and climbers: Ivies, clematis and a vine.
The boundary between us is a Leylandii hedge which is about 30 years old and is annually trimmed to about 7' high. My neighbour is building a large rear extension to his house and asked whether I would mind if he were to remove his side of the double thickness Leylandii to build a 6' boundary wall. Like a shot I said that if he were to remove his side and build a wall then obviously my hedge would be redundant and I would remove it. Originally I had 120+ Leylandii, a run of 75 to the left side and the remainder divided into groups of 10 to the front and right hand side. Over the years I've removed several and replaced them with 6'x6' feather board panels. Two weeks ago my neighbour started the cull. 60 Leylandii (30 from each side were removed) The trench was dug and the foundations poured. I asked for the soil from the trench to be piled onto my side and now have about 5 tonnes of 'black gold' covering my adjoining flower bed with it's perennials and bulbs beneath. The advantages of this extra soil will optimistically give me a blank canvas to start again when time permits and my present indoors decorating ceases.
 Some of the soil is already ear marked to use to level out several hollows in the lawn, the rest will be spread about the borders by wheel barrow. The patio area closest to the house had established clematis, Ivies and a vine. All have been cut back and trampled on to ground level for the purpose of the Mini Trump wall. Time will tell which or what will survive but as they say ' No gain without pain eh?'
The wall has been finished today with the brick piers and capping to do next. I've gained about 2 foot in width after the removal of my 30 Leylandii and effectively reduced my three day long annual trim by 30%.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on March 05, 2017, 07:22:39 PM
Hello Langy
What are you planning to do with your garden now, lets know.

Hello Everyone.
What birds have you seen in your garden during the last week, that's one for you to answer Chessy

Take care
Gerald.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: townie on March 05, 2017, 08:09:28 PM
Perhaps ( chessy ) has seen 1 or 2 Cuckoos in the garden.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: Langstraat on March 05, 2017, 08:44:15 PM
re.
Hello Langy
What are you planning to do with your garden now, lets know.

Well,
I'm still indoors at present decorating so the garden has been neglected for a while. I have a lawn maintenance plan and the first visit of the season is in two weeks time. With a bit of luck and a few days without rain I'd like to cut areas of the lawn quite short and then top dress with the newly acquired soil. It'll mean that there will be a checker board lawn for a few weeks until the grass manages to push through but I have got plenty to do with the flower beds and borders. As mentioned before I'll wait and see which or what perennials have survived before taking a trip to the garden centre and emptying my pockets as I replant.  ;)


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: nickcc on March 06, 2017, 03:25:05 PM
Have been cutting the lawns all through the winter at least once a month.  Unfortunately our dog won't go to the loo if the grass is too long as it must tickle her bits and bobs.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: townie on March 06, 2017, 10:15:16 PM
re.
Hello Langy
What are you planning to do with your garden now, lets know.

Well,
I'm still indoors at present decorating so the garden has been neglected for a while. I have a lawn maintenance plan and the first visit of the season is in two weeks time. Wiith a bit of luck and a few days without rain is like to cut areas of the lawn quite short and then top dress with the newly acquired soil. It'll mean that there will be a checker board lawn for a few weeks until the grass manages to push through but I have got plenty to do with the flower beds and borders. As mentioned before I'll wait and see which or what perennials have survived before taking a trip to the garden centre and emptying with pockets as I replant.

Just put me right on this forum. I read that Langstraat posted this and then replied. Langstraat I think I remember you from another forum but at the moment it escapes me but it will come back.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: Langstraat on March 07, 2017, 08:59:50 AM
"Just put me right on this forum.
Langstraat I think I remember you from another Forum"

Townie,

We've both been on a few together.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: Langstraat on March 07, 2017, 05:13:14 PM
Well today I've managed a day in the garden. The indoor work has been put back another week because the decorators have given back-word and cannot start until the week after next. At least that's taken the pressure off me to clear the room and drain the central heating system to remove the radiator.

The sun made its appearance to this cold damp clime this morning and after filling and shifting 5 barrow loads of the soil my neighbour has deposited on my flower beds I gave up and popped to Aldi. I bought an Electric Tiller to break up the soil and make it lighter to shift and rake over. What a delightful piece of kit. Although it's quite small the motor is very strong and provided a healthy tilth without effort. It was much easier to relocated the soil afterwards and the area beneath the wall where the brickies had trodden has now been  aerated and raked over. There's still a lot to do but at least I've made a start. My neighbour has continued to erect the brick piers and wall is now ready for capping.
This afternoon I awoke the lawnmower and cut and tidied up the lawn so that I could at least see where the hollow areas are, these will be topped dressed and levelled with some of the bonus soil next week weather permitting.

(http://i66.tinypic.com/wki6b4.jpg)

(http://i63.tinypic.com/1h47jt.jpg)


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on March 07, 2017, 05:27:52 PM
Hello Langy
You have a fantastic canvas to create a stunning garden. Do not waste it.
Best wishes
Gerald.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: Langstraat on March 07, 2017, 07:54:46 PM
Hello Langy
You have a fantastic canvas to create a stunning garden. Do not waste it.
Best wishes
Gerald.

Thank Q Gerald, if the weather is okay tomorrow I'll take a photo from a bedroom window to give you a better idea/ view of the flower bed from above.
Presently wrapped up warm looking at plant catologues to gain inspiration


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: Langstraat on March 08, 2017, 01:04:57 PM
Unfortunately I'm not working in the garden today. I have two other projects to contend with.

(http://i64.tinypic.com/o5aruq.jpg)


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: townie on March 10, 2017, 05:15:24 PM
Have you ever noticed that its very rare to see more than one robin at a time in your garden.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: Langstraat on March 10, 2017, 05:29:26 PM
Have you ever noticed that its very rare to see more than one robin at a time in your garden.
I think they're quite territorial, and will fight to the death to protect their patch.
We've had the same one with a white patch for three years.
It's a slightly different story with Blackbirds though, we regularly have three pairs


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: nickcc on March 10, 2017, 07:04:53 PM
Had two wrens fighting the other day, unless it's spring.  Fed up with gulls and the mess they make on the car.  At the moment they appear to be becoming very territorial which could indicate an early spring.  Often see Blackbirds sunbathing with wings outstretched, helps that we don't have cats and feed the birds most days.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: townie on March 10, 2017, 07:06:23 PM
Have you ever noticed that its very rare to see more than one robin at a time in your garden.
I think they're quite territorial, and will fight to the death to protect their patch.
We've had the same one with a white patch for three years.
It's a slightly different story with Blackbirds though, we regularly have three pairs

I imagine mating might be a bit of a problem then


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: Langstraat on March 16, 2017, 08:53:26 AM
Maybe I spoke too soon. Working in the garden yesterday shifting barrow loads of soil I heard 'croaking' so, with fingers crossed maybe frog spawn will follow.

The wall is now finished and capped off and the mini rotavator has been put to good use clearing up the mortar mess left by the brickies. There's still much soil to be distributed but my main task was to dig out and reposition two shrubs which have been in for about 15 years. A spiral Hazel and a handkerchief bush? I had to hire a block and tackle to pull them out after giving up trying to lift them by digging alone. They both came out with ease and were replanted closer to the wall in what hopefully will be their last resting places. The last job was to fit 6 solar lamps to the pillars

(http://i68.tinypic.com/zkqts7.jpg)


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on March 16, 2017, 12:58:07 PM
Hello
Townie and I both responded to your post but seem to have got lost.
Is your garden part of a field and what are buildings next to you.
Gerald


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: Langstraat on March 16, 2017, 03:38:22 PM
Hi Gerald,

I wrote and posted a lengthy piece in answer to the questions asked of me regarding the adjoining farm land and a full background to the structures my neighbour has built. That post plus the posts about frog spawn are no longer viewable.
I didn't keep the post as I usually do so if I get the chance later I'll rewrite.
It's always a shame when the effort and time taken in a thread contribution is lost for whatever reason.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: Langstraat on March 16, 2017, 06:39:31 PM
My garden backs directly onto farm land. The large field gradually drops down to a reservoir. The field until last year has been used for arable crops since its primary use as part of the 'Rhubarb Triangle' for rhubarb ceased over twenty years ago. Last year it was ploughed, fenced and seeded with grass for Beef live stock which we should soon see grazing this spring.

My neighbour is a builder by trade and hobby. He's built several projects since moving in five years ago.
At the bottom of the garden; A raised deck with a barbecue area plus an attached Orangery (a greenhouse to you and I) neither have been used since completion three years ago. It too far to walk carrying a tray of drinks and how many tomato plants does one need?

The structure you can see from my photos was meant to be a gym with a * pump room. That was finished last summer and as above hasn't been used. It has a full sized Pool table ready for use.

Now that the mini Trump wall has been finished off he will continue with the major extensions he's building to the rear of the house. To finish it off he intends to lay a courtyard and excavate a large Koi pool which will be serviced from the *pump room.

I'm going to have the surplus soil from this future excavation as well.
I'll have it spread out over the opposite side garden borders and use it to top off a rockery I intend to build.
Lots to do this year!


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on March 16, 2017, 06:53:50 PM
Hello
Just an idea but you must think about varying the height of the wall to give you a good view from your garden.
Do this by planting some trees and climbing plants, some to run along the wall. Clematis, Wisteria and some grapes grown on the pole system would be a start plus the Wedding Day rose. Some Cornus mass would give you colour in Spring but also grow just above the height of the wall. Some Apricots and Blackberries would look superb plus give you some great fruit.
You must plant some winter flowering Honeysuckle. To walk down your garden in December and smell the fragrance is superb.
People who garden and have a good range of plants lose their marbles much later in life. I was involved in some of this research work if I remember properly !!
Keep in touch
Gerald.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: Langstraat on March 16, 2017, 07:15:31 PM
Gerald,
Many thanks for the suggestions. I did have a vine and and a couple of clematis prior to the building work and I'll wait and see whether they manage to poke through. The old garden shed at the end of the wall has honeysuckle which completely covers the nearest side and roof. The furthest roof section is covered with up turned turf and planted with small suculents.
The workshop has Virginia creeper planted at its base.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on March 27, 2017, 04:14:58 PM
Afternoon Everyone
Its time to sow some Tomato seeds for good. strong early plants. I would not bother with Moneymaker,
hard flesh and tough skins. Alicante is much better or for a a dwarf Tomato try Red Alert. Great flavour
and very easy to grow.
This afternoon I have been potting up Chrysanthemums. Get some young plants now, pot up and keep inside
and in 3 weeks time you will be able to take small cuttings that will root easily so you will have 2 plants for the price of 1.
Always sow Marrow, Cucumber and Melon seeds sideways on a long thin edge. Sown flat down most will rot.
If you have a Fruiting Cherry tree and it is very full of blossom give the tree a gentle shake and slightly reduce numbers of blossoms. This will give you much bigger Cherries and a better flesh to stone ratio.
Give the tree a sprinkle of Hydrated lime, this will also lead to a better crop.
Keep looking for more tips you will not see in many places. To some people knowledge is power. Lets enjoy a
better life by sharing that knowledge. Some people would think my family was boring because 4 of us are
qualified in horticulture. Not the case we really enjoy life working with nature and all it can throw at you.
Take care
Gerald.  60 years in Horticulture.
Gerald


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on March 30, 2017, 12:27:32 PM
Good afternoon everyone, its pouring with rain outside, thank God we have a roof on the house.
At this time of the year people are buying bags of compost and grow bags.
Buy with care and check what is in the bags. Lots of products now contain some chipped up
garden waste from Council Waste Dumps. This may contain diseased matter that could cause
you problems in your garden or greenhouse.
Someone sent me a sample of some compost they had bought from a supermarket. It was Black,
Sticky and Stinking plus it contained pieces of branches 3 to 4 inches long.
If you have already bought some and you are not sure about it do what we always used to do.
Spread it out thinly and water with boiling water.
I am not in anyones pocket I jut give you the truth.
Take care
Gerald.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: nickcc on March 30, 2017, 06:09:45 PM
Problem is that you have to trust your supplier.  We often buy from B&Q mainly because we get the discount on a Wednesday, Our local Garden centre in Breage gets a lot of our business as B&Q often doesn't have what we are looking for.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on March 31, 2017, 05:46:44 PM
Evening All
Always try and buy seeds and plants from a Ministry Approved grower. This should mean what you buy is good and healthy. B&Q compost scored quite decent marks when checked.
We had a case in England where a Supermarket took delivery of several thousand plants and put them on display inside the shop. Within 2 to 3 hours customers were complaining about being bitten by small flies.
The manager acted very quickly and closed the shop. He called for help to deal with the problem and also find the source of the flies.
The plants were potted in rubbish compost with a large percentage of recycled council dump rubbish. It was
full of fly eggs that hatched in the warmth of the shop. The whole shop had to be cleansed before it could re-open. Cost a lot of money to the supermarket and the grower.
Anything you get from a council tip always sterilise with boiling water. Remember it was dumped there for a reason, it might have been very badly diseased. They will chip up any old rubbish.
Best wishes
Gerald.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on April 01, 2017, 02:42:19 PM
A very good afternoon to you all

Time for you to think about things in the garden

Woodlice...Friend or Foe

Earwigs...Friend or Foe

Gerald.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: nickcc on April 01, 2017, 05:52:20 PM
Never liked woodlice but earwigs can bite you.  Sounds daft but when you're young these thoughts stay with you.  I remember my next door neighbour growing Chrysanthemums he always had a pot to catch all the earwigs, we never went anywhere near them in case they jumped out and bit us :)


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on April 02, 2017, 03:13:50 PM
Hello
A Strawberry is not a true fruit..Seeds on the outside. True fruits have seed on the Inside.
Still waiting for answers about Woodlice and Earwigs.
Hope you have all been out sowing some peas for an early feed from your own garden to go
with the Welsh Lamb on a Sunday.
Any questions send to me with a fiver and I will get someone to try and answer them.
Keep digging
Gerald.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on April 03, 2017, 11:27:56 AM
Hope you have just popped in for a cup of tea before you go back out into the garden.

Woodlice...Foe...Do as much damage to any plants as Slugs and Snails. Will climb trees and shrubs to eat new growth tips.

Earwigs...Eat or kill great numbers of Aphids ( green and black fly ). Problem is the bite with the pincers. Very painful.

Next questions

What type of fruits do Hops have ??

What are Triploid plants ??

Answers please, if no replies Miss Simpson will be round with the stick.

Gerald.



Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on April 04, 2017, 07:59:25 PM
Evening Everyone.
I have read online today someone asking what to do with bowls of bulbs you have had in the house but have now
stopped flowering. Answers from two people chop all the leaves off and bury the bulbs in the garden.
That would be the end of the bulbs, thy need leaves at least to the end of May to build up
nutrients to flower next year. What we should do is dig a hole that is deep enough for the bulbs to have nearly six
inches of soil on their shoulders. Hold the leaves upright and back fill planting hole. They will then flower next year.
The hyacinths in the first year of flowering outside after flowering inside will have longer stems and the flowers more
spaced out. Look like giant Bluebells.
If you have bulbs in the lawn cut round them as above to get flowers next year.
Take care
Gerald.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: Langstraat on April 04, 2017, 09:09:46 PM
Gerald,
Here's one for you.
Last year at Easter time I bought a pot grown tree about 7' tall ( I forget the name)from my local nursery. The root ball was approx. (the size of a standard bucket) The buds burst and leaves began to form. It was planted in a mixed bed. During the summer the leaves started to drop off and by Autumn it was dead. I removed it and replanted another tree I the same spot not thinking that that was the cause of the failure. The latest tree is not showing any sign of life so I suspect that there is some form of localised toxicity. Plants within a foot are thriving well.
Suggestions please.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on April 06, 2017, 05:06:23 PM
Hello Langy
What was the second tree you planted.
Was the tree bought from Ministry Inspected Premises.
It could be a Toxin but please give me more information.
On the first tree what colour were the leaves when they dropped and
were the leaves on the second tree the same colour.
Did the bark become sticky.
What month of the year did they die.
Did they die slowly or quickly.
Do you see any deposits on the soil around the trees.
Give me all the information you can please.
The big problem we have is all the diseased material coming from the EU
We also now have 19 tree species under serious risk of extinction.
Recently some material infected with Plum Pox arrived here from the EU.
A very big job to locate all of that but the Ministry did it. It would have
wiped out all types of the prunus family in the UK
Ever since we joined the EU we have had a major battle on a vertical playing field.
My 2 Sons now run our Propagation Nursery and we have random checks to see
as all our material is disease free. The check is both visual and in the lab.
All tested plants and trees are tagged and must not be sold until the Ministry
say its clean and healthy.
Now we are getting out of the EU I think a lot more testing will be done particularly
on imported rubbish. Sadly your trees might have been unhealthy when you purchased them.
Let me have the answers and I will try to answer the question.
Best wishes
Gerald.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: Langstraat on April 07, 2017, 09:58:16 AM
Gerald,
The tree is a Gleditsia, Golden Honey Locust. I forget what the original tree was. At present there was no stickiness on either trees. Both carried the RHS labels and were purchased from a local nursery where the climate is the same as in my garden. Both were grated stock. There was no visible signs of distress. The planting site is quite sheltered a 3x4 metre area with a backdrop of Leylandii and in between a shed and workshop. There are a few rose bushes, perennials and spring bulbs. The underlying soil is quite heavy clay although the planting hole was dug out and replaced with some garden compost.
When I purchased both trees they were tall and narrow in shape because of the nature of their display and storage at the nursery. To encourage a more open stature I placed weights*  on their branches to open them out.
* The weights were large Fir cones.

(http://i68.tinypic.com/5ogfu8.jpg)


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: Langstraat on April 07, 2017, 11:30:00 AM
(http://i67.tinypic.com/znr59y.jpg)


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: Langstraat on April 07, 2017, 02:10:00 PM
Just remembered, the first tree was a Sorbus


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on April 09, 2017, 04:38:11 PM
Hello Langy
I will be in touch with you soon
Take care
Gerald.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: Langstraat on April 09, 2017, 11:03:13 PM
Okee dokee,
No rush. I have lots to do:
 scarifying the front lawn, planting climbers to the wall but best of all moving huge rocks for a proposed rock garden which may end up quite the opposite as a japenese zen garden


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on April 11, 2017, 04:42:03 PM
Hello Langy
I will start with the Sorbus.
RHS labels mean nothing at all about plant health. Just to tempt you to buy.
Is this a wet spot in your garden, a slight ooze from a water or sewerage pipe,
or is it a very dry spot where the builder buried a lot of rubble.
It could be a variant of SOD, Sudden Oak Death.
It could be Fungal Root Rot that will cause the roots to
rot very quickly and die but will not affect nearby plants.
Field Voles could have badly damaged the roots.
Vine Weevils could also have stripped the roots.
I will now look at another option and this could be the answer.
If The tree was full of roots in the pot and the roots had started going
in circles the tree would not be able to take in moisture.
Sorbus roots will not straighten and search out water so die. Thats
why I asked what Month it died. Very often June, July, August.
If you buy any plants where the roots are in this condition always
go around the root ball with a sharp knife and make a few cuts
through roots, this should induce the plant to produce new roots that
will grow straight when you plant it out in the garden.
Cabbage, Cauliflowers and Brussels Sprouts will not grow properly if
the main tap root hits the bottom of a seed tray and bends.
Hope this is some help to you and I will soon be back to you about
your other tree.
Best wishes
Gerald.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: Langstraat on April 11, 2017, 05:20:14 PM
Gerald,
The roots were quite compacted when the root ball was extracted from its container. I teased them out as I have done before. The hole had a couple of spade fulls of garden compost. It was firmed in, staked and watered in well.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on April 11, 2017, 07:09:57 PM
Hello Langy
Sorbus roots need to be cut to get them to grow outwards and well watered through out the
summer. I understand that with a lot of plants you can give them a watering in but just
not enough with a lot of trees. Plant an upside down 3 litre pop bottle with the bottom cut off
close to the tree stem and if the weather is dry fill the bottle up every day.
If Rhododendrons are short of water in July they will not flower and any buds will just drop off.
Magnolias may do the same.
Another trick you can try is to put 3 or 4 whole wet oasis blocks under the tree.
Speak again soon,
Gerald.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: Langstraat on April 11, 2017, 07:17:31 PM
You may have hit the nail on the head Gerald, it could well be the lack of watering, even though the accompanying plants thrived well.
Many thanks for your help. I'll still give the present tree chance to show some sign of life, it could be a late developer.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: Langstraat on April 12, 2017, 04:37:26 PM
Gerald,
I went back to the garden centre this afternoon to check out their Gleditisa and found that this particular tree is one of the latest to show growth. Returning home I took a photo shown below and am delighted to report that there are now many tiny buds breaking through. I shall heed the advice you've given with regard to watering.
Thank you.

(http://i63.tinypic.com/wtc1ty.jpg)


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on April 14, 2017, 05:32:46 PM
Hello Langy
Gleditsia are very strange trees, they may burst into life in March but may delay until July.
They are prone to root rots and root die back.
Sometimes they produce great numbers of seeds that germinate easily all over the surrounding area,
they can take over and become invasive.
The pods and seeds are food enhancers, put into foods they make you eat more.
Put into animal foods the animals put on weight more quickly but suffer Liver damage.
If you were growing this tree in some countries you would be arrested and sent to prison.
Bet you did not know that.
Everything said it is a quite attractive tree to grow in your garden.
Take care
Gerald.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on November 17, 2017, 06:12:34 PM
Evening All
Wait a little longer before you start pruning.
Gerald.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on November 22, 2017, 05:41:15 PM
Hello
If you have any garden questions post them on this forum and I will try to help you.
Research in the USA proves that people who garden have better sex lives and live much longer
without showing any signs of dementia.
Get out in the garden now.
Gerald.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: Langstraat on November 23, 2017, 01:03:10 AM
Well, that's another season over eh?

My flower beds have been rotavated over and most of the compost heap ploughed in.
Over three hundred spring bulbs planted, daffs and tulips.
The leaves have been 'blown' over the bottom fence onto the field where the herd of cattle have eaten almost all of them..
The garden pool has been cleared of Gunnera leaves and the filters have been cleaned ready for the pump switch off.
I could have a Heron problem if it wasn't for the fishing line trip wire deterrent, so that has been repaired

I've had a quote from a Paver this afternoon to extend and re-lay my patio. At present I have concrete slabs and some have settled and look a bit of a mess. After planting all of the spring bulbs I've decided to put back this patio project until after they have had a chance to flower, probably till May or June. There was so much upset to the spring bulbs and flower beds last January when the garden wall built and the trench spoil was dumped so this coming season I'll give it a better chance to settle down.

I've lifted the Dahlia tuber this year because I need to rearrange their location. I've got them stored in a cold frame for the time being until I can pack them better with sawdust when I empty my workshop extractor.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on November 26, 2017, 03:31:22 PM
Afternoon Everyone
We started to lift the Dahlia tubers this week as the foliage had now gone black after a bit of frost. Cut the stems
back to 3 inches and place upside down in a basket to let any water drain out.
Get the Runner Bea sticks in and before putting away soak the ends in a deep bucket of boiling water to destroy
and minute dangerous insects and fungal spores/ Make sure to treat BOTH ends.
Cut Roses back to half their height, trim again to 4 inches at the end of February.
Do not use Anvil Secateurs these badly bruise plants and allow fungal spores to enter plants.
More, lots more to follow.
Gerald.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: Edifi on November 28, 2017, 03:42:34 PM
Hi G G all the Begonia tubas are drying out nicely in the shed ready to be wrapped up and 3 tubs of leaves for the the leaf mold,seems to be rotting down o k


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on November 28, 2017, 08:11:59 PM
Hello Everyone
Have dug up the Dahlia tubers, cut off the tops to 2 jnches and put upside down in trays to drain and dry.
When using ByPass Secateurs always have thin blade against what you are keeping so if you are cutting Roses down by half,
the thin blade will be soil side. Used in the wrong way you cause bruising and die back.
Its these little things that give a better garden and crops.
Keep reading
Gerald.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on November 30, 2017, 07:53:46 PM
Evening Everyone
Soon be time to take cutting of a number of plants such as Black Currants.
Use good strong growth, weak growth will produce very weak plants.
Keep looking and do remember to clean all your garden tools.
Take care
Gerald.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on December 01, 2017, 08:59:06 PM
A Very Good Evening To You
If you like Broad Beans sow some seeds this weekend for early pickings next year.
Keep happy
Get Gardening
Gerald.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on December 12, 2017, 06:02:21 PM
Evening Everyone
I have been out and about looking at Garden Centres in the full Christmas Spirit.
The best with no shadow of doubt was Mappleborough Green Garden Centre. Super range of quality plants
and the whole centre decorated for Christmas in the most amazing way. A half size steam train coming out of a tunnel
blowing steam and smoke wishing everyone a Merry Christmas. You could not help getting into the full
feel of Christmas. Everywhere dressed up to look like Christmas.
An excellent Restaurant with good food and service to complete the visit.
Congratulations to James and his staff.
Best wishes
Gerald.
I am not paid for this post.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on December 19, 2017, 09:50:27 PM
This is the time of the year when Father Christmas is in every ones mind.
The Gardener will also know that this is a special time of year when we plan what we want to achieve next year.
You now have 10 days to collect and sow Holly Berries. They will be at full ripeness and germinate very well in
the spring if sown now. A 50 / 50 mix of compost and sand will be fine. Sow them half an inch deep and put tray
outside but protect from birds, mice and rats. Come April you will see the seedlings emerge. If you did not sow them now
they would take 2 years to germinate.
After Christmas keep the Mistletoe in a paper bag in the garage or shed until they turn very soft so I will explain
how to sow these in the middle of January. Think about this. Mistletoe only grows on the underside of a branch and not
the top or side.
Keep some Hazel Nuts and Chestnuts and next week we will look at how to sow and grow these.
The Gardening on this forum will now become a weekly feature and I will be happy to try and answer any questions.
Been in the garden for 62 years.
Gerald.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on January 03, 2018, 10:35:10 PM
Want some real tasty Broad Beans sow some Monica this week.
Very hardy, Early and excellent taste.
Gerald.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on January 04, 2018, 01:05:47 PM
Afternoon Everyone
Research in the USA proves that people who garden live on average 10 years longer and
also are sexually active much longer.
Research in the UK shows that people who garden keep all senses active for much longer.
People who suffer depression feel brighter after being in he garden. Mixing with smells and colours
and avoiding long spells of violet. Violet can cause agitation. I was involved in some of this work
on a site in Ward End. People stayed their and were taken into the garden every day and
behaviour patterns monitored.
This work we repeated in Swansea.
A lot of research on the effects of colour on people was done 100 years ago by a Mr Steiner. His work
has never been disproved. We can have colour shortage and feel ill so it is important to see a good
range of colour everyday.
Raised beds with a range of herbs will keep the nose awake. That idea was used by the Romans.
Grow well and keep the weeds down.
Gerald.


Get the spade and fork out.
Gerald.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: Twm Sion on January 05, 2018, 04:38:47 PM
Hi Gerald
Horse manure is good for gardens I understand. Its a job to get horse manure these days with straw in it. Most horse owners are using wood shavings for stable bedding. Do you think this will rot down in a reasonable time to be used on the garden. Or do you think the wood shavings will make the garden toxic?

Many thanks Twm Sion 


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: townie on January 05, 2018, 05:13:21 PM
Hi Gerald
Horse manure is good for gardens I understand. Its a job to get horse manure these days with straw in it. Most horse owners are using wood shavings for stable bedding. Do you think this will rot down in a reasonable time to be used on the garden. Or do you think the wood shavings will make the garden toxic?

Many thanks Twm Sion 

Is Horse manure really good for gardens? If not then there will be lot of people through the ages disappointed. Personally I think that if you have good soil you don't need manure, but there again I'm not a gardener.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on January 05, 2018, 05:54:01 PM
Hello Everyone
Horse manure is the best animal manure and really helps to getter better crops.
Mix it up with the wood shavings and sprinkle a little sulphate of Ammonia over the heap.. It will be great stuff.
This is the first post sent on my new computer, my Christmas present from my
lovely wife.
Best wishes
Gerald.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: Twm Sion on January 06, 2018, 08:49:04 PM
Hi Gerald
Horse manure is good for gardens I understand. Its a job to get horse manure these days with straw in it. Most horse owners are using wood shavings for stable bedding. Do you think this will rot down in a reasonable time to be used on the garden. Or do you think the wood shavings will make the garden toxic?

Many thanks Twm Sion 

Is Horse manure really good for gardens? If not then there will be lot of people through the ages disappointed. Personally I think that if you have good soil you don't need manure, but there again I'm not a gardener.
Hi townie, I always think if you take something out of the garden you should put something back in. All about the Nitrogen cycle (I think)


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: Twm Sion on January 06, 2018, 08:50:59 PM
Thanks Gerald, I'll get a few bag fulls and give it a try.
Twm Sion


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on January 08, 2018, 04:49:40 PM
Hello Everyone
Sort out your seed trays and get or make some 6 inches deep. This week we will make a start on sowing seeds and we will
take some cuttings. Why would we damage some cuttings.
Answers on a post card please as they used to say in the Sunday Mercury.
Edmund where did Doug Ellis set up his first business and what was it.
Townie I still have no pictures, any more ideas for me to try.
Sharpen the Secateurs and the Grafting knife.
Gerald.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: Edifi on January 08, 2018, 09:38:59 PM
Gerald,don't know much about Doug Ellis never met him till about 1960 when me my wife and brother used to do the food in the supporter club on match day's.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: GardenGerald on January 09, 2018, 05:12:06 PM
Evening
He started a travel agents in Newton Street. Nice chap and full of confidence. I'm heading for the top and I intend to get there .
That was his motto but he was not big headed. Ha always walked into a room as if he owned it.
Harry Faber was a top Criminal Lawyer with a practice in Newton Street. He taught me that you never say will you pay me today.
You ask if they will give cash or a cheque today.
I did pick up a few hints from these people.
Gerald.


Title: Re: IN YOUR GARDEN
Post by: Edifi on January 09, 2018, 10:17:12 PM
Remember now Gerald,Ellis Travel